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Shipwrecks | Archaeology | Stories | Pirates | Treasure

Shipwrecks

Some of the shipwrecks and there history

Stories

Some of the stories unearthed during our research

Gallery

See some of the images created by Steve & Neville

About Us

Steve & the late Neville Oldham are a couple of amateur marine archaeologists documenting some of their diving experience and research

Steve

Steve had a career working as an Electronic Systems design & Software Engineer working on Medical, Nuclear, Avionics including the "Tornado" fighter aircraft. In the latter part of his career he specialised in Project Management consultancy before retiring. Since the age of nineteen he spent his spare time diving on over 500 shipwrecks around the UK and abroad. Since retiring he has taken up the hobby of Marine Archaeology for which he has won several British Sub Aqua Club awards taking him to Buckingam Palace to meet Prince Philip.

The late Neville Oldham 1935 - 2015 RIP

Neville started his career in the Grenadier guards. On leaving the army he started his own building company specialising in restoring older building. In between his building career he ran a dive boat out of South Devon where he gained considerable knowledge of the local shipwrecks. The was a “Fellow” of the Nautical Archaeological Society and appeared in various BBC programs including “White Slaves Pirate Gold”, “Digging for Britain”, and “Ancient Britain”. His archaeological work has also gained him various awards which took him to Buckingham Palace.

Latest news from around the world (Last updated September 2018)

Portuguese 400 year old shipwreck found off Cascais

Spices, ceramics and cannons engraved with Portugal's coat of arms all lie around the wreck, found near Cascais, close to the capital Lisbon. The team believe the ship was returning from India when it sank sometime between 1575 and 1625. This was at the height of Portugal's spice trade with Asia. Who owns treasure hidden under the sea? Hunting the shipwrecks of the slave trade Lying 12m (40ft) beneath the surface, project director Jorge Freire told Reuters news agency the wreck was very well-preserved. "From a heritage perspective, this is the discovery of the decade," he said, calling it "the most important find of all time" for the country.

Wreck of Captain Cook's HMS Endeavour 'discovered' off US coast

The possible discovery of HMS Endeavour off the east coast of the US has been hailed as a “hugely significant moment” in Australian history, but researchers have warned they are yet to “definitively” confirm whether the wreck has been located. On Wednesday Fairfax Media reported archaeologists from the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project, or Rimap, had pinpointed the final resting place of the famous vessel in which Captain James Cook reached Australia in 1770. The ship was later used by the Royal Navy in the American war of independence and was eventually scuttled with a dozen other vessels off Newport, Rhode Island in 1778.

Ancient Greek shipwreck treasure trove found

Dozens of shipwrecks in the Aegean reveal a new story about ancient seafarers. Most of the wrecks date back to the Greek, Roman and Byzantine eras.

WW1 U-boat propeller 'stolen from wreck' returned to Germany

A stolen propeller from a World War One U-boat is being returned to Germany after being recovered in Wales. The submarine UC-75 was responsible for sinking 56 merchant ships and two warships before it went down in the North Sea in 1918. But propellers from the vessel were found in a storage unit in Bangor, Gwynedd, a year ago. It is thought the items were illegally taken from the U-boat wreck by a diver off the east Yorkshire coast. One of the propellers has been handed back to the German Navy in Plymouth, while the other will go on display at the Royal Navy Museum in Portsmouth. "These propellers tell a story of bitter conflict and human loss, but also of bravery, selflessness and love," said Vice Admiral Sir Alan Massey, the chief executive of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency.

Shipwreck claim: Police probe Shinil Group over 'Russian treasure find'

Police have raided the offices of a South Korean company which claims to have found a treasure-laden shipwreck. Shinil Group said in July that it had found the Russian cruiser Dmitrii Donskoi, which sank in 1905 and was rumoured to hold gold worth billions of dollars. Speculation has since spread that the alleged find might have been a scam to trick investors. Shinil chief Choi Yong-seok has been banned from leaving South Korea. Treasure hunters have searched for the Dmitrii Donskoi for decades, and the announcement of its discovery in July made headlines around the globe. Shinil released submarine footage showing what it said were parts of the wreck near the island of Ulleungdo, between South Korea and Japan.

New evidence reveals Goodwin Sands shipwreck's secrets

Crew members of a ship which sank off the Kent coast more than 275 years ago have been identified. Researchers used archive documents to name 19 of the 237 shipmen who were on board the Dutch ship the Rooswijk. Among them were a senior surgeon, a 19-year-old on his first voyage and a sailor who had previously survived a shipwreck. The vessel, which was carrying coins and silver ingots, sank on Goodwin Sands in January 1740. More than a thousand vessels are known to have been wrecked on the notorious sandbanks, dubbed "the great ship swallower".

Mssion to find the wrecks of two warships, one French and one English, that sank 500 years ago off the Brittany port of Brest.

Instead of Cousteau's old minesweeper Calypso, it is the French culture ministry's surveillance ship André Malraux and its doughty crew of scientists and divers. Today's adventure: to locate, excavate and eventually raise the wrecks of the Cordelière and the Regent - two behemoths of the Tudor seas that sank together in the Battle of Saint-Mathieu in 1512. And filling the Cousteau role is Michel L'Hour, marine archaeologist extraordinaire and veteran of a thousand missions to explore France's underwater heritage. "I have been obsessed with finding these ships for 40 years," he says, ruddy-faced and bearded like any proper sea-dog.

Hidden Compartments in This Wrecked Confederate Submarine Could Solve a 150-Year-Old Mystery

The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley was a 40-foot-long (12 meter) sausage of bulletproof iron built in Mobile, Alabama, and propelled through the water by seven daring men cranking a single, giant screw. It was, it's fair to say, not the safest place in which to spend the Civil War. During the Hunley's brief career, between July 1863 and February 1864, the primitive sub sank three times, which resulted in the deaths of 21 of its own crewmen. Nevertheless, on Feb. 17, 1864, the Hunley made history by ramming a live torpedo into the hull of the Union warship USS Housatonic, becoming the first submarine in history to successfully sink an enemy vessel.

Race for Russian warship’s ‘5,500 boxes of gold’

The badly damaged Russian Imperial Navy cruiser was located by manned submersibles at a depth of 434 metres about 1.3km off Ulleungdo on Sunday morning. The Seoul-based maritime salvage company Shinil Group has been searching for the precise site of the wreck for several years and put together a team of experts from South Korea, China, Britain and Canada for this year’s effort.

Archaeologists Find 'Holy Grail of Shipwrecks' Carrying Stash Worth Up to $17 Billion

In 1708, the San José— a Spanish galleon ship carrying a stash of gold, silver and emeralds — sank during a fierce battle against the British in the Caribbean Sea. Now, after sitting at the bottom of the ocean for 310 years, the San José's shipwreck has finally been officially identified, thanks to an analysis of the distinctive bronze cannons that sank with the ship.

Amazing Artifacts from a Java Sea Shipwreck

In the 1980s, fisherman in the Java Sea discovered the remnants of a shipwreck that would have looked much like this model in its glory days. The ship, a merchant vessel thought to have gone down in the late 1200s, more likely sank in the second half of the 1100s, according to new research.

HMS Invincible shipwreck's latest artefacts revealed

More artefacts from a warship that was wrecked in the Solent in 1758 have been brought to the surface. HMS Invincible - built by the French in 1744 and captured by the British in 1747 - is believed to be one of the most significant warships ever built. A second excavation is being carried out on the wreck site near Portsmouth. Among the finds are a gunpowder barrel, swivel guns, woodworking tools and a sandglass used in calculating the ship's speed.

Photographic processing unlocks more secrets from HMAS AE1 shipwreck

Australia’s first submarine, lost at sea for over 100 years, continues to reveal its secret history through advanced 3D processing techniques of underwater still photography. Researchers are digitally reconstructing the sunken HMAS AE1 using about 8500 still images captured of the submarine during an archaeological surveying expedition earlier this year, with the goal of gaining a better understanding of the submarine’s fate.

Shipwrecks: Who owns the treasure hidden under the sea?

New details have emerged about the San Jose, a Spanish galleon sunk by British ships 300 years ago. The vessel was said to be transporting gold, silver and precious gems collected in the South American colonies to be shipped to Spain's King Philip V to help finance the war of Spanish succession. Colombia said it first discovered the wreck, located somewhere off the coast of Cartagena, in 2015.

Royal Navy wreck discovered 74 years after it sank in heavy storm

The wreck of a Second World War Royal Navy support vessel has been discovered 74 years after it sank in a heavy storm amid a U-boat attack on its convoy. The Empire Wold was attempting a rescue after a tanker and another ship were torpedoed and sunk off Iceland in 1944 when she disappeared. Her 16 crew all perished in what some believed was the third U-boat attack on the group of ships.

South Australia’s oldest shipwreck found off Encounter Bay

Encounter Bay is now home to the state’s oldest shipwreck after maritime heritage experts made the discovery in Rosetta Harbor this month. Minister for Environment and Water David Speirs said experts had been looking for the wreck of the barque South Australian for many years. “The ship was driven ashore in a storm on 8 December 1837 while anchored in Rosetta Harbor at Encounter Bay, but its exact location remained a mystery until this year,” he said.

Shipwreck divers jailed for failing to disclose artefacts

Shipwreck divers who looted a Royal Navy vessel at the bottom of the English Channel have been jailed for failing to disclose the items they took. HMS Hermes was a protected cruiser built in the late 19th century and converted into an aircraft ferry and depot ship ready for the start of the First World War.

Search continues for undiscovered Great Lakes shipwrecks

The wreck of a Second World War Royal Navy support vessel has been discovered 74 years after it sank in a heavy storm amid a U-boat attack on its convoy. The Empire Wold was attempting a rescue after a tanker and another ship were torpedoed and sunk off Iceland in 1944 when she disappeared. Her 16 crew all perished in what some believed was the third U-boat attack on the group of ships.